On September 14th the tenth edition of the Postcode Lottery Green Challenge will come to an end during a special grand finale in Amsterdam. We are delighted to announce that Her Majesty Queen Máxima will attend this award ceremony. The entrepreneur with the best sustainable businessplan  will receive the prize of 500,000 Euro, the runner-up wins 200,000 Euro.


“Terra preta” or “black soil” is very fertile, dark and manmade soil found in the Amazon. It’s the result of an indigenous farmers’ practice 3000 years ago, they would bury charcoal in the ground to boost the otherwise relatively infertile Amazonian soil. The charcoal allows the soil to capture and retain nutrients better, leading to higher crop yields. Back then the farmers didn’t know their practices would have a lasting impact on the land. Yet today, the terra preta sites are worth five times more than sites with regular soil.


If you’re a girl, you’ve definitely followed the sun while tanning. Always making sure your towel faced the sun in a straight angle, guaranteeing optimal sun exposure and minimal shade lines. It’s quite possible Eden Full and her girlfriends used to do this as well, and maybe this is even what led Full to invent and develop the SunSaluter. The SunSaluter is essentially a way for solar panels to gain optimal sun exposure throughout the day by moving with the sun. As a solar tracking system, the SunSaluter boosts the energy output of solar panels by 30% a day.


While we’re exceptionally thorough in making sure our plastic waste fills every corner of the earth, we’re simultaneously shockingly effective in allowing methane gas to burn away the ozone layer. It’s impressive really.
But perhaps more impressive is how Mango Materials is tackling both our plastics and our methane problem at the same time while allowing us to continue to use our beloved plastics and produce methane.



From Earth Hour to Circle Economy – fighting climate change for a better world

Almost ten years ago, I was the co-founder of Earth Hour. 2007 was the very first Earth Hour and one of the most extraordinary experiences I have ever had, standing by Sydney Harbour watching this beautiful city go dark and realising that there were millions of people out there who shared our desire for change.  But more than this, as the days got closer to Earth Hour, it was the diversity of participation that was most impressive – from priests, rugby league clubs, school kids and major corporations to drag queens and speed skaters.  It was the start of the manifestation of Earth Hour’s powerful mainstream reach, the people ‘in the middle’ that we in the green movement had struggled to engage in the past.


Summertime often equals campfires and BBQ parties. However, what serves as a luxurious and enjoyable pastime for the lucky few, is actually serious health-hazard for most. Globally, over 4 million people die every year from household air pollution mostly due to cooking over burning wood, animal dung or charcoal. To paint a grim picture, the average wood-burning stove can produce 400 cigarettes’ worth of smoke every hour. Besides abundant health issues, this widely used practice has other detrimental side effects as well such as deforestation and pollution. The solution: SolSource, the solar powered cooker…


How many times have you bought something for one specific purpose only to let it collect dust for all eternity afterwards? How many times have you needed a *insert object here* but didn’t want to buy one and after a failed attempt to borrow one from a friend, you either give up on your project or improvise with a far inferior object? Sound familiar? Enter, Peerby. Peerby is like that incredibly useful neighbor who you don’t have to make small talk with every time you see each other but whose drill you can always borrow. Peerby allows you to use everything you need without buying it, without cluttering your storage space and with the added bonus that you get to know your neighbors.


What can we do to stop the plastic pollution crisis? Molly Morse says, make an eco-friendly alternative. The world was left dumbfounded by the Castaway-like story of Jose Salvador Alvarenga, a 36-old fisherman from El Salvador who was found alive in 2014 on the southernmost tip of the Marshall Islands 438 days after a massive storm had slammed his boat off course. Without a working engine, GPS or cell-phone, his remarkable story of survival features tales of catching fish by hand and prayers to God as he drifted aimlessly.


Eben Bayer grew up on a maple farm in Canada. To fire up the boiler they’d use woodchips, which is where Bayer first learned about mycelium or “nature’s glue”. Heaps of woodchips would – as you may imagine – start to grow mushrooms when left alone outside and when it was time to move the woodchips into the boiler, some chunks would stick to each other and the shovel because of the mycelium in the mushrooms. At the time, Bayer probably didn’t think he would use this knowledge to transform the packaging industry, but that is in fact what happened.



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